Egypt and Art > Store

Howard Hughes 1930 Pre-Code Epic Hell's Angels Vintage Jean Harlow Photograph For Sale

Howard Hughes 1930 Pre-Code Epic Hell's Angels Vintage Jean Harlow Photograph


This item has been shown 315 times.

Buy Now

Howard Hughes 1930 Pre-Code Epic Hell's Angels Vintage Jean Harlow Photograph :
$36

Thanks to all our buyers! We are honored to be your one-stop, 5-star source for vintage pin up, pulp magazines, original illustration art, decorative collectibles and ephemera with a wide and always changing assortment of antique and vintage items from the Victorian, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, and Mid-Century Modern eras. All items are 100% guaranteed to be original, vintage, and as described. Please feel free to contact us with any and all questions about the items and our policies and please take a moment to peruse our other great items. All sell ! ITEM: This is a 1930 vintage and original production still photograph from the Howard Hughes World War I-era aviation epic, "Hell's Angels" (1930). Stars Jean Harlow and Ben Lyon share an amorous moment during a scene from the critically acclaimed film. Originally shot as a silent film, Hughes retooled "Hell's Angels" over a lengthy gestation period. Most of the film is in black-and-white, but there is one color sequence, the only color footage of Harlow's career. Controversy during the "Hell's Angels" production contributed to the film's notoriety, including the accidental deaths of several pilots, an inflated budget, a lawsuit against a competitor ("The Dawn Patrol"), and repeated postponements of the release date. "Hell's Angels" was one of the highest-grossing films of the early sound era, but despite this it still failed to recover its exorbitant production costs. It is now hailed as one of the screen's first sound action films. An amazing piece of early Classic Hollywood memorabilia! Measures 10" x 8" on a glossy, single weight paper stock.
Verso is blank. CONDITION: This photograph is in very good condition with creasing and softening at the corners, scattered edge wear including previously repaired tears, soiling/toning, scattered vertical striations in the emulsion, and storage/handling wear throughout. Please use the included images as a conditional guide. Guaranteed to be 100% vintage and original from Grapefruit Moon Gallery. Harlean Carpenter, who later became Jean Harlow, was born in Kansas City, Missouri, on March 3, 1911. She was the daughter of a successful dentist and his wife. In 1927, at the age of 16, she ran away from home to marry a young businessman named Charles McGrew, who was 23. The couple pulled up stakes and moved to Los Angeles, not long after they were married, and it was there Jean found work as an extra in films, landing a bit part in Moran of the Marines (1928). From that point on she would go to casting calls whenever she could. In 1929 she had bit parts in no less than 11 movies, playing everything from a passing woman on the street to a winged ballerina. Her marriage to McGrew turned out to be a disaster--it lasted barely two years--and they divorced. The divorce enabled her to put more of her efforts into finding roles in the movie business. Although she was having trouble finding roles in feature movies, she had more luck in film shorts. She had a fairly prominent role in Hal Roach's Double Whoopee (1929). Her big break came in 1930, when she landed a role in Howard Hughes' World War I epic Hell's Angels (1930), which turned out to be a smash hit. Not long after the film's debut, Hughes sold her contract to MGM for $60,000, and it was there where her career shot to unprecedented heights. Her appearance in Platinum Blonde (1931) cemented her role as America's new sex symbol. The next year saw her paired with Clark Gable in John Ford's Red Dust (1932), the second of six films she would make with Gable. It was while filming this picture (which took 44 days to complete at a cost of $408,000) that she received word that her new husband, MGM producer Paul Bern, had committed suicide. His death threatened to halt production of the film, and MGM chief Louis B. Mayer had even contacted Tallulah Bankhead to replace Harlow if she were unable to continue, a step that proved to be unnecessary. The film was released late in 1932 and was an instant hit. She was becoming a superstar. In MGM's glittering all-star Dinner at Eight (1933) Jean was at her comedic best as the wife of a ruthless tycoon (Wallace Beery) trying to take over another man's (Lionel Barrymore) failing business. Later that year she played the part of Lola Burns in director Victor Fleming's hit Bombshell (1933). It was a Hollywood parody loosely based on Clara Bow's and Harlow's real-life experiences, right down to the latter's greedy stepfather, nine-room Georgian-style home with mostly-white interiors, her numerous pet dogs - right down to having her re-shoot scenes from the Gable and Harlow hit, Red Dust (1932) here! In 1933 Jean married cinematographer Harold Rosson, a union that would only last eight months (although Rosson lived another 53 years, he never remarried). In 1935 she was again teamed with Gable in another rugged adventure, China Seas (1935) (her remaining two pictures with Gable would be Wife vs. Secretary (1936) and Saratoga (1937)). It was her films with Gable that created her lasting legacy in the film world. Unfortunately, during the filming of Saratoga (1937), she was hospitalized with uremic poisoning. On June 7, 1937, she died from the ailment. She was only 26. The film had to be finished by long angle shots using a double. Gable said he felt like he was in the arms of a ghost during the final touches of the film. Because of her death, the film was a hit. Record numbers of fans poured into America's movie theaters to see the film. Other sex symbols/blonde bombshells have followed, but it is Jean Harlow who all others are measured against. - IMDb Mini Biography By: Denny Jackson Ben Lyon was your average boyish, easy-going, highly appealing film personality of the Depression-era 1930s. Although he never rose above second-tier stardom, he would enjoy enduring success both here and in England. Born Ben Lyon, Jr. in Atlanta, Georgia, the future singer/actor was the son of Alvine Valentine (Wiseberg) and Benjamin Bethel "Ben" Lyon, a pianist-turned-businessman, and the youngest of four. His maternal grandparents were German Jewish immigrants. Raised in Baltimore, he started performing in amateur productions as a teen before earning marquee value on Broadway opposite such stars as Jeanne Eagels. Hollywood took notice of the baby-faced charmer and soon Ben was ingratiating filmgoers opposite silent film's most honored leading ladies. He appeared with Pola Negri in Lily of the Dust (1924), Gloria Swanson in Wages of Virtue (1924), Barbara La Marr in The White Moth (1924), Mary Astor in The Pace That Thrills (1925) and Claudette Colbert, in her only silent feature, in For the Love of Mike (1927). He advanced easily into talkies and was particularly noteworthy as the dashing hero in Howard Hughes' Hell's Angels (1930), in which Ben actually piloted his own plane (Ben had trained as a pilot during WWI) and filmed some of the airborne scenes for Hughes himself. That same year was also a banner year for him in his personal life after marrying Paramount Pictures film star Bebe Daniels, with whom he had appeared in Alias French Gertie (1930). As both of their movie careers started to decline, the talented twosome decided to work up a husband-and-wife music hall and vaudeville act. They took their show to England and became a hit at the London Palladium. At one point he served in the U.S. Army Air Force and rose to the rank of Lt. Colonel in charge of Special Services for the U.S. Air Corps in England. Soldiers, sailors and airmen (from 1939) listened to Ben and Bebe weekly on the air waves with their popular, long-running BBC broadcast "Hi, Gang!" The couple remained in England throughout WWII performing on stage and doing their valid part to entertain and honor the troops. After a brief postwar stay in Hollywood in 1946, where Ben had taken an executive position with Fox, the couple returned to England and headlined another popular 1950s radio show, "Life with the Lyons," which spawned two family-styled films that included children Barbara Lyon and Richard Lyon. In the early 1960s Bebe suffered multiple strokes and left the limelight, passing away in 1971. Ben remarried (to former actress Marian Nixon) and settled in the US, where he died in 1979 of a heart attack while on vacation. - IMDb Mini Biography By: Gary Brumburgh


Buy Now

A Star Is Born (1976) Barbara Streisand Original Photograph, Classic Pose P4 picture
A Star Is Born (1976) Barbara Streisand Original Photograph, Classic Pose P4


Original Hollywood Dorothy Dell(1915-1934) Photo 13 Mo Old Beauty Contest Winner picture
Original Hollywood Dorothy Dell(1915-1934) Photo 13 Mo Old Beauty Contest Winner


1937 Publicity Photo Premiere Movie
1937 Publicity Photo Premiere Movie "high Wide And Handsome" William Frawley


Colleen Moore Original Vintage 1935 Stunning Glamour Portrait Photo picture
Colleen Moore Original Vintage 1935 Stunning Glamour Portrait Photo


Colleen Moore Original Vintage 1935 Stunning Glamour Portrait Photo picture
Colleen Moore Original Vintage 1935 Stunning Glamour Portrait Photo


Vintage Photo Of Actress Lillian Gish Autographed picture
Vintage Photo Of Actress Lillian Gish Autographed


Mary Duncan Sexy Leggy Vintage Portrait Photo By Elmer Fryer picture
Mary Duncan Sexy Leggy Vintage Portrait Photo By Elmer Fryer


Orig Photo 1938 Reckless Living Jimmy Savo Frank Jenks Chester Clute # 65 picture
Orig Photo 1938 Reckless Living Jimmy Savo Frank Jenks Chester Clute # 65