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Vintage Canopic Jar Faience Set Qebehsenuef Falcon God & Hapi Baboon God Statues For Sale

Vintage Canopic Jar Faience Set Qebehsenuef Falcon God & Hapi Baboon God Statues


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Vintage Canopic Jar Faience Set Qebehsenuef Falcon God & Hapi Baboon God Statues:
$225

This set of antique hand carved Egyptian Canopic Jars were created in the Egyptian Revival style
On the inside of the top of Hapy's lid, you can see the white, sparkling calcite beneath the faience glaze
Color is a perfect example of true Egyptian faience blue pale turquoise with brown {see Egyptian faience bowl at Christies}
Jars are first hand carved from calcite then embalmed and hand painted in a heated faience glaze which adheres to the stone surface
The front of each jar bears the raised images of the Uraeus, winged serpent and the scarab beetle god, Kephri, symbol of rebirth
Hapy, the baboon-headed god representing the north, his canopic jar contained the lungs and was protected by the goddess NephthysQebehsenuef, the falcon-headed god representing the west, his canopic jar contained the intestines and was protected by the goddess Serqet
Listing is for set of Two canopic jars
One of each; Qebehsenuef & Hapi
Two sons of Horus
Qebehsenuef has a chipped beak tip which has gold powder beneath and Hapi has a chipped rim on inner lid portion

Height from base to tip reaches 9.5 Cm
Circumference of jars 16 cm around widest point
Imported from EgyptMade in Egypt
Ancient History:
Qebehsenuef ("He who refreshes his brothers") is an ancient Egyptian deity. He is one of the four sons of Horus in Egyptian mythology, the god of protection and of the West. In the preparation of mummies, his canopic jar was used for the intestines. He is seen as a mummy with a falcon head. He was said to be protected by the goddess Serket. The intestine was used in sacrificed animals, by soothsayers, to predict the future, whereas the intestines were also the victims of poison. With death by poison, the canopic jar deity is protected by Serket who bears the emblem of the scorpion.
[Qebhsennuf saith:] "I am thy son, O Osiris Ani, triumphant. I have come to protect thee. I have collected thy bones, and I have gathered together thy members. I have brought thy heart and I have placed it upon its throne within thy body. I have made thy house to flourish after thee, O thou who livest for ever.
Hapi, sometimes transliterated as Hapy, is one of the Four sons of Horus in ancient Egyptian religion, depicted in funerary literature as protecting the throne of Osiris in the Underworld. Hapi was the son of Heru-ur and Isis or Serqet. He is not to be confused with another god of the same name. He is commonly depicted with the head of a hamadryas baboon, and is tasked with protecting the lungs of the deceased, hence the common depiction of a hamadryas baboon head sculpted as the lid of the canopic jar that held the lungs. Hapi is in turn protected by the goddess Nephthys. When his image appears on the side of a coffin, he is usually aligned with the side intended to face north. When embalming practices changed during the Third Intermediate Period and the mummified organs were placed back inside the body, an amulet of Hapi would be included in the body cavity.
Since drowning was the form of death associated with the lungs, the deity gained the name geese, in reference to floating on water. The spelling of his name includes a hieroglyph which is thought to be connected with steering a boat, although its exact nature is not known. For this reason he was sometimes connected with navigation, although early references call him the great runner, as below from Spell 521 of the Coffin Texts.
You are the great runner; come, that you may join up my father N and not be far in this your name of Hapi, for you are the greatest of my children – so says Horus"
In Spell 151 of the Book of the Dead he is given the following words to say:
I have come that I may be your protection, O N; I have knit together your head and your members, I have smitten your enemies beneath you, and I have given you your head forever.
As one of the four pillars of Shu and one of the four rudders of heaven he was associated with the North, and is specifically referenced as such in Spell 148 in the Book of the Dead.


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